Tag Archives: Ventilation

Thermal Bridges And Ventilation Overseas

thermal bridges
In Europe, strict regulations are in place to control thermal bridges and air-leakages to minimise the energy needed for heating and cooling. Furthermore, due to the colder climate, a lot of structural damage can occur if heat and vapour is able to ‘travel’ through building materials.

Unlike in Europe, the significance of avoiding gaps and thermal bridges is commonly unknown and not a regulatory requirement in Australia. Common practice often shows that there is barely attention paid to minimising gaps and thermal bridges, leading to unwanted thermal bridges and air-leakages and therefore increases the need for cooling and heating.

Requirements to minimise thermal bridges
Maximum values of heat transfer through thermal bridges are specified and need to get incorporated into the energy ratings. Windows and doors as well as junctions of different building parts and materials require much detailing during the working drawing stage, as well as on the building site. It’s the architect’s/designer’s responsibility to find and draw solutions to overcome thermal bridges, and the builder’s to build accordingly.

Conclusion
Although air-leakages and thermal bridges are not accounted for in energy ratings, they can majorly limit the ability and the potential benefits of insulation and other passive solar design solution. Consequently even a house with a 6, 7 or 8 star-energy rating could be draughty in winter. Avoiding air-leakages and thermal bridges means minimising unwanted heat gain or loss and therefore reduces the energy needed to cool or heat a building.

Stack-Effect and Clerestory Windows

stack effect

Stack-Effect

The term “stack-effect” goes back to the chimney. The heat source – in this scenario, the fire – heats up the air. Hot air rises and is discharged through the chimney, as it has a lower density than cold air. This effect can be used to replace air inside a house. For instance, when it’s colder outside the windows can be opened to let in cooler air. Warmer air inside the room will rise towards the ceiling, exiting via high openable windows, clerestory windows and skylights. Warm air inside is replaced by fresh and cooler outdoor air.

Clerestory Window

clerestory is a usually a high wall with a band of narrow windows along the very top. The clerestory wall usually rises above adjoining roofs.

Originally, the word clerestory referred to the upper level of a church or cathedral. The Middle English word clerestorie means “clear story,” which describes how an entire story of height was cleared to illuminate large interiors.

If you want to maintain wall space AND keep a room well-lighted, or if normal solar access is either not possible or restricted consider this type of window arrangement for your home. Clerestory windows are most often used to naturally illuminate large spaces such as sports arenas, transportation terminals, and gymnasiums. But can be a great addition to any home.